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Acts of Kindness

By Tom Irmen

Recently, while fueling up at Costco, I witnessed the Costco fuel attendant coming to the assistance of an elderly couple having difficulty navigating the self-serve features of the fuel pump. Their experience was made even more difficult because their automobile’s fuel cap was on the opposite side of the fuel pump. This attendant went well above and beyond by not only helping them relocate their vehicle, but also by offering his arm as support for the husband, who was having difficulty walking. And this same attendant remained with them until their transaction was completed.

Today we seem to witness fewer displays of kindness, likely the result of our increasingly societal polarization. But hopefully this single random act of kindness witnessed by multiple Costco customers will encourage others, regardless of what might separate us, to extend a helping hand to a person in need. In our society, these displays of kindness are not demonstrated as often as they should or could be.

Regardless of the size company you own, whether you employ hundreds, dozens, or just yourself, I would encourage you to add one more resolution to your list of resolutions for 2018, and that would be to commit to performing random acts of kindness within your community. Perhaps you can come to the assistance of an elderly individual having difficulty loading their car outside of a store. Maybe you can help an unemployed veteran find a job. Or perhaps you could donate food store gift cards to your church, who in turn can gift them to a needy families within your community. Commit yourself to performing these random acts of kindness – not for the purpose of self-edification, but because what we do when no one is looking defines who we are as a person.


As small business owners, we often come into contact with numerous people throughout our day. Why not use this opportunity to display random acts of kindness and perhaps inspire your associates to do the same – not just during the holiday season, but every day of the year? Consider adding just one more item to the growing list of products and services your small business already offers, and add random acts of kindness. Their impact might amaze you.

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Rebalance and De-Stress

By Tom Irmen

Entrepreneurs understand that owning and operating a small business is anything but a stress-free experience. Stress is an inevitable part of our lives and can often be accelerated when we find ourselves out of balance. Oftentimes we believe that we can achieve greater productivity simply by working longer hours, although often at the expense of family, friends, and other healthier pursuits. But, in fact, we often discover that when we neglect these other important facets in our lives, stress will often worsen, negatively impacting not only our business and important relationships with our customers and co-workers, but our family and friends as well.
Most small business owners find that there isn’t always a direct correlation between the hours you invest in your small business and the productivity that results. Just the opposite can result, where longer workdays can often diminish your productivity and increase the stress that you experience.
Stress should not be taken lightly, as it can have a very serious impact on not only your health, but just about every other aspect of your life. While true stress-free living is unachievable, you can strive towards a balanced life that will allow you to truly appreciate and enjoy your relationships with your family, friends, co-workers, and customers and the success in business you are working to achieve. The secret is balance.
Commit to making time for those special people in your life. Don’t risk sacrificing your relationships with these very special people in your life in pursuit of your dream. After all, it’s that same dream whose rewards you hope to share with those closest to you in the future.
Date night and quality time with your kids are not negotiable. Cherish them as rewards for the many hours of effort you have invested in your journey to achieve success in your small business endeavor. Sacrificing relationships for the sake of success is a recipe for disaster and a fool’s errand.

Also, if you’re truly sincere in your desire to minimize the stress associated with building your small business and in achieving balance in your life and in your personal relationships, go one step further. Tell a trusted friend about your commitment to de-stress and rebalance, and then ask them to periodically review your efforts and to hold you personally accountable. An unwillingness to become personally accountable may signal your true lack of commitment.

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Entrepreneur

Mar • ket • ing

“The technique of promoting, selling, and distributing a product or service”

By Tom Irmen

While most entrepreneurs can offer you a superficial definition of marketing, and while perhaps believing that their respective companies are efficiently implementing a well-thought out marketing strategy, the fact is that very few small businesses effectively market the goods and service they sell.


Many small business owners continue to view marketing and advertising as one in the same. Also, the strategies they employ are oftentimes fragmented and lack the comprehensive approach required to transform mediocre results into superior results, usually with the investment of far fewer resources.

The most successful small business owners I have observed during more than three decades share many common characteristics:

» They have a clear understanding of what “marketing” constitutes
» They have a long-term perspective
» They clearly differentiate themselves from their competitors
» And, most importantly, they are “tenacious” in implementing their strategies

Successful entrepreneurs avoid the “new idea of the moment club,” where marketing strategies are changed or adjusted with every new day. They also understand that advertising is just one vehicle for implementing their successful marketing strategies.


In order for your marketing strategies to succeed, they must be bold, comprehensive, and clearly communicated to your associates and your existing and prospective customers. You must articulate not only how you differ from the competition, but, more importantly, how your customers will benefit personally from your unique, differentiating characteristics.

Successful entrepreneurs also carefully evaluate existing advertising platforms, selecting those that most efficiently and cost-effectively communicate their messages to their target audience. These different platforms support each other, rather than act independently, and are designed to achieve both your short- and long-term marketing strategies.

Procrastinators will suggest that they lack both the time and expertise necessary to implement a successful marketing strategy, but the truth is that they usually end up investing far more time and money in their piecemeal approaches to marketing, which often fails to deliver the desired results.

These successful small business owners I speak of belong to a unique 5% club, which enjoys 95% of the success achieved. There are no obstacles preventing you from joining this elite club except a genuine commitment from you to win.

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Entrepreneur

Self-Employment – Beyond Virtual Reality

By Tom Irmen

Several years ago I attended a luncheon that featured a retired Air Force General who shared with us his decades-long military career. What I remember most about his experience was how he invested years of personal effort positioning himself for a much coveted career within the Pentagon. He went on to discuss his disillusionment with his newfound Pentagon position, where he had once hoped to be able to make a genuine and lasting contribution. He suggested that if a totally dedicated individual invested their entire career at the Pentagon, working 24/7, their contribution would likely go unnoticed.

I think this general’s observations may also accurately describe how many professionals who have worked in the nation’s largest corporations must feel about their careers, a feeling that despite devoting one’s entire energy to a cause, that very few substantive changes resulted. I believe this common sense of frustration frequently serves as a catalyst for those individuals departing the corporate world and instead pursuing careers in the world of small business.

One advantage resulting from a self-employment career, although it can also be frustrating at times, is that our responsibilities range from those of a CEO to those of building maintenance. Regardless, self-employeds are treated to a front row seat for most every decision they make, unlike their large corporate counterparts. 

Leading a small business is an incredible learning experience that includes a great many moving parts, requiring that you wear a multitude of hats, including management, marketing, finance, legal, production, and a host of others. The experience can be exhilarating for most and perhaps a bit overwhelming for others. You are afforded an opportunity to see the “big picture” rather than the limited view offered in a larger corporate environment.


Small business owners typically make important decisions in far less time then would have been possible in the corporate world, allowing them to take greater advantage of opportunities in a more timely manner when the greatest upside potential for success exists. True, we don’t have many of the other perks offered by the major corporations, but self-employment offers you a front row seat to where the real action is and places you squarely on the competitive playing field – an experience that those in the corporate world can only fantasize about. Self-employment offers you a level of reality that simply doesn’t exist in today’s corporate realm.

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The Keys to Success in Small Business Hiring

The Keys to Success in Small Business Hiring

By Tom Irmen

Hiring great employees has replaced financial concerns as the top challenge confronting small business owners today. Employees are your company’s lifeblood, and they can assure either your success or your demise.

Very few of us possess a human resources background, and our continually improving unemployment rate further complicates our hiring efforts as the available labor pool continues to contract. So here is a list of several hiring challenges that you’re likely to confront and how they can potentially be overcome.

» There’s a “pulse” syndrome
I routinely observe business owners who react to a pulse. They have a position to fill, which requires a single individual, so they hire the next person that comes through the door. This is particularly true of startup companies. Far too often we’re so engaged with the day-to-day activities required to launch a new enterprise that we fail to take the necessary time to identify qualified applicants, but we’re never too busy to replace them. These bodies with a pulse risk not only slowing down your forward progress, but perhaps taking down your small business altogether. Properly screening qualified applicants requires far less time than it takes to replace them.

» Competing with the big guys
How can you hope to compete in today’s labor market when large organizations offer better benefit packages and higher starting salaries? While those perks may be deciding factors for some applicants, others might prefer less bureaucracy, more flexible working conditions, and perhaps a greater opportunity for advancement. With a growing number of large corporations shedding employees, fewer applicants feel that corporate America offers the employment the same security they once believed existed.

» No human resource talent
Few of us possess the full array of talent management skills and HR experience needed to efficiently hire, train, and manage new associates. But by carefully selecting applicants that possess these skills, you can gradually overcome many of your deficiencies by creating a team of like-minded individuals who don’t need to be micro-managed.

The key to success in hiring is to allocate the necessary time to carefully identify the needed qualifications required by an applicant to succeed in their new position. Screen applicants carefully, and avoid the “pulse” syndrome. Find the right candidate who will not only complement your team, but perhaps supplement your areas of personal weakness.

Looking for a few good team members? How about former members of our military? Performing as part of a team is second nature to them, and they frequently exhibit a level of loyalty and respect for leadership that is uncommon nowadays.

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Entrepreneur

Economic Expectations Versus Reality

By Tom Irmen

According to the NFIB (National Federation of Independent Business) Index, small business optimism has continued at historically high levels now for more than six consecutive months. NFIB President and CEO, Juanita Duggan, said that this “remarkable surge in optimism that began last year right after the election shows no sign of slowing down.”

But indexes, like sentiment, can be disappointing to small business owners who were hoping for a “quick fix” to the economic doldrums that our economy has been languishing in for the past decade or so. Not to say that there hasn’t been bright spots, because there has been. But just where is the growth that entrepreneurs had grown accustomed to after prior recessions?

Today entrepreneurs need to balance expectations with reality. Much of the positive economic news being reported on today is forward looking. Like the stock market, where values are a reflection of anticipated future results, economic indexes are an attempt to gauge future economic activity.


But there’s a catch, because much of today’s positive financial news requires that Washington or, more specifically, the new administration act to put into place the requisite fiscal policies needed to stimulate future economic growth. And it’s here where expectations meet reality. Policy changes such as personal and business tax cuts, infrastructure spending, and renegotiated trade agreements will take time to enact and even more time for their impact to be felt. DC is like a Kabuki dance, where there is always a great deal of drama but oftentimes little in the way of measurable results.

Small business owners who are accustomed to making quick and decisive decisions are understandably frustrated by Washington bureaucrats who move at the speed of a sloth, if even that fast. And the fact that we have had to live with this decade of slow or no growth makes us even more impatient for action.


Change has occurred, albeit slowly. Change will continue to occur, and our nation’s economic engine will once again reward you for your efforts, perseverance, and, most of all, patience.

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Is Entrepreneurship Right For You?

By Tom Irmen

To be clear, I use the term entrepreneur to refer to an aspiring small business owner and not an individual employed by a business that might exhibit entrepreneurial characteristics. The two individuals are very different, as a business owner risks everything, whereas a non-owner risks very little by comparison.


I don’t know if business ownership is part of the cultural fabric woven into the American dream or not, but it was for me. I do, however, believe that many would-be business owners often romanticize about becoming an entrepreneur and the perception they have of the freedom they think awaits them upon launching their very first venture.


Self-employment is clearly not for everybody, and far too many persons discover this only after investing a great deal of time and money into a new business. But there are steps you can take to avoid the same mistakes made by so many unsuccessful would-be entrepreneurs.

If you feel that you have what it takes to succeed in the self-employment arena, I would encourage you to seek the advice of several trusted and experienced business mentors who can help you to better appreciate what might lay ahead as you navigate the uncertainties of small business ownership. In addition, questions you may want to ask yourself include:

» Am I comfortable taking risks?
» Can I act independently?
» Can I be persuasive and compelling?
» Do I possess the necessary skills to negotiate?
» Can I think and act creatively?
» Do I have a strong system of mentors in place?

Starting and owning your own business can be an exciting and rewarding experience for the true entrepreneur that understands that they will confront far more challenges than they might otherwise experience as an employee. Becoming a successful entrepreneur requires careful planning, creativity, and, most of all, lots of hard work.


Statistics show that the potential for success as a business owner is very low indeed. But I believe that if these same statistics were adjusted so as to differentiate between the true entrepreneur and those would-be business owners possessing little more than good intentions, you would discover that the potential for success is likely much higher than you might have anticipated for the genuine entrepreneur.

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Small Business Optimism Surges

By Tom Irmen

Since the election of 2016, there has been an undeniable surge in small business optimism nationwide. And despite the feelings on the part of many that this upswing in optimism is tied directly to the presidential election, I have no interest in wading into the possible political aspects of this much welcomed rise in sentiment. Besides, we already have a 24/7 news media that will debate this renewed optimism for us.

Regardless of who you voted for in the last election, there’s no denying that this new level of optimism among small business owners has spiked dramatically in recent months. The real question for you to consider is how are you planning to take full advantage of this rising tide?

Here are some facts to consider:
» Small business lending has now increased to pre-recession 2008 levels, signaling an expansion in small business growth.
» A recent Bank of America survey found that 51% of small business owners expect the economy to improve during the next 12 months compared to only 31% last fall.
» ADP has reported a nearly three-fold increase in hiring from the fourth quarter of 2016 by small businesses that employ fewer than 50 employees.
» The National Association of Manufactures has reported that 93% of manufacturing industry executives are optimistic about the future of the economy, up from 56% just a few months ago.

Regardless of all of these positive signs, the great recession has dramatically changed the behavior of many of today’s small business owners, and entrepreneurs are displaying a heightened level of caution. Much of today’s optimism can be directly traced to future expectations that are reliant upon a variety of governmental actions that are anything but certain. But despite this level of uncertainty, the cost of inaction on your part can result in missed opportunities and the erosion of market share.

While risk aversion is more a part of a business owner’s DNA today than it was a decade ago, even the most cautious among us should be encouraged enough by recent developments to take advantage of this long awaited rise in optimism. Consider expanding into a new product or service line or stepping up your existing marketing efforts to successfully differentiate your small business from your competitors, helping existing and would-be customers to understand and appreciate just how they will benefit from doing business with your company.

The cost of action is likely far less than the cost of sitting on the fence.

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Entrepreneur

The High Cost of Inaction

By Tom Irmen

Perhaps because I’m 67 years old, I think more often about those issues confronting other entrepreneurs my age. Whether those issues involve planning for retirement, health, or end-of-life considerations, most small business owners would be best advised not to postpone examining these very important issues for themselves.

The truth is that far too many business owners have failed to put a comprehensive retirement plan into place. Perhaps they’re anticipating that the potential future sale of their business will provide the resources needed for retirement. But relying on the successful sale of your small business in the future to provide for your retirement is not without risks.

Other business owners may be contemplating a continued stream of income during retirement after turning their business over to their children to manage. But if you lack a succession plan, that son-in-law you can’t stand could end up at the helm of that same company you worked a lifetime to build. Also, in the absence of a succession plan, the divorce of one of your children could result in the dissolution of your company, all which could be detrimental in the future to your retirement.

If you believe that life will become simpler as you grow older, think again. Life has many moving parts, and delaying decisions on important issues that can impact your future will only compound the pressure you’re likely to experience later in life when you are forced to act. Also, inaction can create a level of anxiety that most people might prefer to avoid.


So how can you avoid this doom and gloom scenario? Find a trusted financial planner, one who will work closely with your attorney and accountant, who can help you find the answers to both the questions you have, as well as the answers to questions you might not have even considered. Acting today will provide you with a level of confidence and the peace of mind that has likely been evading you, not to mention greatly enhancing your potential for a successfully and prosperous retirement But your key to success rests on your decision to act today – not tomorrow, next week, next month, or next year.

Imagine a future free from financial stress, where your income is assured and your company is continuing to operate efficiently and profitably while being managed by those individuals you’ve personally selected. Consider, too, that your spouse, children, and grandchildren will be provided for as well, because you chose to act and not to entrust your future to a roll of the dice. What are you waiting for?

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Pricing is More of an Art

Pricing is More of an Art
By Tom Irmen

Few entrepreneurial responsibilities faced by small business owners are more challenging than establishing prices for your company’s products and services. For many entrepreneurs, it’s a shot in the dark. Others may rely on competitive price comparisons within their marketplace, or perhaps your franchise or dealer network provide pricing recommendations. Regardless of how you arrive at your company’s pricing structure, pricing should be regarded as both a short- and long-term strategy designed to be a driver of both sales and high margin profitability.

Here are some important points to keep in mind when establishing your pricing strategy:

  • Being busy does not equate to being profitable.
  • Closing on 100% of your proposals likely means that your prices are far too low.
  • Price gouging will likely only attract additional competitors into your marketplace, which will result in lower overall marketplace prices.
  • Customers typically do not view pricing the same way as entrepreneurs. If the perceived value the customer receives from your products and services far exceeds their actual cost of the product, your price is likely too low.

Pricing is more of an art than a science, and many of us lack the prerequisite skills or experience needed to create a comprehensive pricing strategy. Regardless, the responsibility is yours.
Familiarize yourself not only with your competitors’ pricing but, more importantly, the perceived value they offer customers. Don’t rely entirely on the pricing models provided by a franchise or dealer who may be unfamiliar with your local marketplace. And don’t use pricing as the only tool to secure each and every proposal.

Every interaction with a potential customer provides the perfect opportunity to access your company’s value proposition. Are you viewed merely as a commodity or as a company whose extra services are perceived as extremely valuable, perhaps even indispensable, to a client? It is absolutely imperative that you clearly articulate to every potential customer the real value of the services or products that you offer if you are to succeed. Customers will select the company with the higher actual price, provided that the perceived value they receive is greater.

And one final thing. An estimated 20% to 30% of all customers are low price shoppers. Avoid them. This is the commodity marketplace that will leave you broke.

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